Educational Articles

Small Mammals

  • Phenobarbital is used off label and given by mouth or as an injection to treat seizures or to sedate your pet. Common side effects include sleepiness, increased thirst, urination, and/or appetite. Do not use this medication in pets with liver, lung, or kidney disease or those that are allergic to barbiturates. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • COVID-19 is a human respiratory disease that was initially discovered late in 2019. This disease is caused by a new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, that has not previously been identified in humans. Physical distancing, or social distancing, is one of the most effective strategies available to reduce the spread of COVID-19. While physical distancing, walking your dog is fine as long as you are feeling well and can remain at least 6 feet away from other people. If you have cats, find new ways to play with them indoors. Many veterinary clinics are adjusting their policies to reflect physical distancing guidance related to COVID-19. If your pet needs veterinary care (or if you need to pick up medication, a prescription diet, etc.), call your veterinary hospital first to determine how to proceed.

  • Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan (PSGAG) is given by injection and is used on and off label to treat arthritis and degenerative joint disease. Side effects are uncommon but may include joint pain, joint swelling, vomiting, diarrhea, lack of appetite, or sleepiness. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it, or pets with a known or suspected bleeding disorder. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Prednisone/prednisolone is given by mouth or injection and is used on and off label to treat Addison’s disease, inflammatory conditions, neoplasia (cancer), and immune-mediated diseases. Give this medication as directed by your veterinarian. Common side effects include increased drinking, increased urination, and increased appetite. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it, or pets with systemic fungal infections, viral infections, ulcers, tuberculosis, or Cushing’s disease. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Telemedicine is the act of practicing medicine from a distance and your appointment will be conducted by a licensed veterinarian. Before your appointment, gather information on your pet’s history and your current concern. Look at a calendar and write down a timeline of your pet’s problems. Be prepared to answer questions that you would normally be asked at an in-person appointment. Write notes to help you remember everything. Most telemedicine appointments involve the use of some type of video chat. Conduct your visit in a quiet area with good lighting and have your pet with you before the call starts. Not all concerns can be addressed through telemedicine. If your veterinarian is unable to arrive at a diagnosis via telemedicine, he or she can help you determine the next step for your pet to ensure that he or she receives optimal care.

  • Having your pet properly prepared for a blood test helps to ensure that the results are as accurate and reliable as possible. Preparation for these two types of tests is slightly different. Your veterinarian will give you specific instructions before your appointment. It is important that you follow these instructions exactly to ensure accurate test results.

  • Winter cold weather poses a number of risks for our pets. Antifreeze commonly used in winter is extremely toxic if ingested. Cold damp weather can be very harmful so dogs should ideally be kept inside most of the time during the winter. If this is not possible, dogs need a raised shelter large enough to be comfortable but small enough to retain heat. Extra calories are needed for outdoor dogs to keep warm. Paws can be affected by frostbite, as well as ice or damaging ice melt compounds. Feet should be checked and wiped after being outside. Rabbits should be maintained at constant temperatures as they are not able to handle the differences between indoor and outdoor temperatures in winter.

  • Probiotics are given by mouth and are used over the counter to treat gastrointestinal upset. Give as directed by your veterinarian. Side effects are rare but may include gas or mild discomfort. Do not use in pets that are very sick and immunocompromised, or in pets that are allergic to it. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Propranolol is given by mouth or injection and is used off-label to treat abnormal heart rhythms. Side effects are not common but may include lack of energy and diarrhea. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or pets with heart block, heart failure, asthma, or a slow heart rate. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Pyrantel pamoate is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat intestinal parasites in many species. Give as directed. Side effects are uncommon but may include stomach upset, such as vomiting or diarrhea. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it. If a negative reaction occurs, call your veterinarian.

Location

  • Main Office

    6085 Creditview Rd. #20

    Mississauga, Ontario, L5V 2A8

Location Hours
Monday9:00am – 7:00pm
Tuesday9:00am – 7:00pm
Wednesday9:00am – 7:00pm
Thursday9:00am – 7:00pm
Friday9:00am – 7:00pm
Saturday9:00am – 5:00pm
Sunday12:00pm – 5:00pm